Sites accessible to persons with reduced mobility

Marque Bretagne

The Brocéliande forest is accessible to persons with reduced mobility 

Many sites are suitable for persons with reduced mobility. You will be able to admire remarkable trees, legendary landmarks and take part in activities adapted to your needs.

 

To view all the sites accessible to persons with reduced mobility, download the map of accessible sites 

Guillotin's Oak

You will most certainly be surprised by its exceptional circumference (10 metres!) and its gigantic branches… Previously called the Chêne des rues Éon, a tribute to Éon de lÉtoile, this remarkable tree located in Concoret is thought to be between 800 and 1,000 years old. It takes its name from Father Guillotin, a defiant priest who found shelter in the hollow of its trunk during the French Revolution. Sadly, the oak is in poor health. Blame its old age and Breton storms! The French national forestry office (ONF) has therefore put in place certain measures to preserve it as much as possible. A viewing platform has been installed in order to protect the tree from the flow of tourists.

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For more information, click on the link to Guillotin’s Oak

To view all the sites accessible to persons with reduced mobility, download the map of accessible sites

The Oak of the Hindrés

Outstanding by its size and tortuous-shaped branches, the Oak of the Hindrés is one of the largest of its kind in the Paimpont state forest. The term “Hindrés” refers to a humid place. Classified as a remarkable tree since 1997, it is a sessile oak (Quercus petraea). At the grand old age of around 500, the Oak of the Hindrés will impress you! Its large straight trunk and its majestic weaving branches watch over walkers like the shadow of a wise old man… Keep in mind that access to this tree is restricted during the hunting season.

For more information, follow the link to the Oak of the Hindrés 

To view all the sites accessible to persons with reduced mobility, download the map of accessible sites 

 

The Lake of the Paimpont Abbey

The lake of the Paimpont Abbey lies at the foot of a prestigious abbey, built in the thirteenth century. This man-made body of water of about 50 hectares is home to many animal and plant species. Around the lake, a well-maintained circuit will guide you through a rare natural environment: the peat bog. The first part of this circuit is accessible to persons with reduced mobility.

The circuit

  • Starting point: car park of the Paimpont Abbey
  • The first, accessible, part of the path takes about 45 to 60 minutes.
  • The circuit is closed from 1 October to 31 March during the hunting season.

For more information, follow the link to the lake of the Paimpont Abbey 

To view all the sites accessible to persons with reduced mobility, download the map of accessible sites 

 

The Valley of No Return

Not far from the small town of Tréhorenteuc, this valley cut through purple stone is also called Perilous Valley or Valley of False Lovers. Enough to put off more than one hiker! Yet, many embark on the trails of the Valley of No Return, and this enthusiasm certainly has something to do with the beauty and wonder of the place… The first part of the circuit is accessible to persons with reduced mobility. You will be able to admire the Tree of Gold (Arbre d’Or), a work of art set up in 1991 to commemorate the dreadful fire that damaged the woods in 1990. It is located right next to the Fairies’ Mirror, a calm lake where it is said that seven fairies used to live…

For more information, follow the link to the Valley of No Return

To view all the sites accessible to persons with reduced mobility, download the map of accessible sites

Merlin's Tomb

Merlin is a mythical character, son of the devil and of a pure young maiden. He first appeared in literature around the twelfth century, in Geoffroy de Monmouths Prophetia Merlini. His traits and talents evolved with time and with the imagination of the many writers who told his story: he is in turn a druid, an enchanter, a diviner… He is most famous for being a close adviser to King Arthur… In the nineteenth century, Arthurian legends were rediscovered and intellectuals relocated the sites of the legends to Brocéliande… Thus, it is here that Merlins tomb can be found, a doomed place where the Fairy Vivien locked him up forever in a bubble of air…

Before the site of Merlins Tomb was partly destroyed in the nineteenth century, the monument was a megalithic tomb: a 12-metre-long red-schist covered gallery, dating back to the Neolithic era, of which only two stones remain today.

For more information, follow the link to Merlin’s Tomb

To view all the sites accessible to persons with reduced mobility, download the map of accessible sites

The Giant's Tomb

About four metres long and one metre wide, the Giants Tomb certainly takes its name from its dimensions! This tomb dating back to the Bronze Age was rediscovered at the end of the 1970s and excavations started in 1982. It is also referred to as the Roche à la vieille, the old ladys rock. The French expression la vieille was often used in popular stories to evoke a witch or even Death itself (spooky!).

Beware, the path is in poor condition.

For more information, follow the link to the Giant’s Tomb

To view all the sites accessible to persons with reduced mobility, download the map of accessible sites 

The Monks' Garden

For many years forgotten, buried in gorse, the Monks’ Garden was rediscovered by members of the association Les Amis du Moulin du Châtenay. Excavations undertaken in 1983 and 1984 by archaeologist Jacques Briard and his teams, led to the complete uncovering of the site. Vases from the Neolithic era were found and confirmed the use of the monument as early as 2500 BC.

For more information, follow the link to the Monks” Garden

To view all the sites accessible to persons with reduced mobility, download the map of accessible sites 

The Castle of Trécesson

Built in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, this medieval castle overlooks a body of water in the village of Campénéac. A private property classified as a national Historic Monument, its ghostly legends will send shivers down your spine… Who knows, perhaps you will bump into the ghost of the White Lady, an unfortunate bride who was buried alive and forever haunts the castle lake… Or meet the ghosts of the card players who allegedly killed each other during a not so friendly game…

The castle is not open to visitors, but can be viewed from the outside.

For more information, follow the link to the Castle of Trécesson

To view all the sites accessible to persons with reduced mobility, download the map of accessible sites 

The Church of the Holy Grail

Built in the twelfth century, the church of Tréhorenteuc is dedicated to Sainte Onenne. Daughter of King Saint Judicaël, she rejected her royal heritage and decided to live in Tréhorenteuc. In 1942, Father Gillard was appointed rector of Tréhorenteuc, where the church was falling into disrepair… What a sad sight for the parish priest! But he was a true original: he was convinced that all religions stem from the same faith. And when he discovered the power of myths in Brocéliande, he decided to transform his church to shine a light on the gospel through the legend of the Holy Grail… For twelve years, he renovated his church and gave it a mythical appearance where faith and legends intertwine, a sight that can still be enjoyed today.

For more information, follow the link to the Church of the Holy Grail

To view all the sites accessible to persons with reduced mobility, download the map of accessible sites